Since 2015, the Anti-Fraud Collaboration has leveraged its successful series of webcasts by creating online self-study courses for corporate ethics training. These courses can be taken free of charge with the potential of earning up to two continuing professional education (CPE) credits per course. For those who do not need CPE but are interested in viewing the webcasts, click here to watch the videos on YouTube.

FREE-OF-CHARGE SELF-STUDY COURSES

Financial reporting fraud can prove costly for investors and other capital market stakeholders. This CPE course will explore the concepts included in Anti-Fraud Collaboration report, The Fraud-Resistant Organization: Tools, Traits, and Techniques to Deter and Detect Financial Reporting Fraud. The report takes a fresh look at best practices for fraud deterrence and detection, highlighting the critical importance of collaboration on this issue between and among the key players in the financial reporting supply chain. (January 2015)

Moderator:

  • Cindy Fornelli, Executive Director, Center for Audit Quality

Panelists:

  • Ken Daly, President & CEO, National Association of Corporate Directors
  • Karl Erhardt, Senior Vice President & General Auditor, MetLife
  • Tracy McBride, Vice President, Research and Accounting Policy, Financial Executives International
  • Rick Ueltschy, Managing Partner, U.S. Audit Services, Crowe Horwath LLP

Take this course by clicking HERE.

These days, most people understand the importance of the “tone at the top” and realize that a company’s financial reporting environment and culture can act as a strong deterrent to fraudulent financial reporting. But beyond the right “tone,” what else can be done? What additional steps can be taken to deter fraud or, if fraud should get a foothold, to stop it in its tracks? Identifying these additional steps is a tough challenge, but an analysis of prior SEC enforcement releases yields clues about fraud deterrence and detection that go right to the mechanics of a company’s system of internal control over financial reporting. In this CPE course, listen to a panel of experts discuss lessons learned from those SEC enforcement actions, and provide concrete, action-oriented steps that governance professionals can take. (July 2015)

Moderator:

  • Cindy Fornelli, Executive Director, Center for Audit Quality

Panelists:

  • Mary Ludford, Chief Audit Executive, Exelon Corporation
  • Margaret McGuire, Vice Chair, SEC Financial Reporting and Audit Task Force
  • Dan Sunderland, Partner, Deloitte & Touche LLP
  • Michael R. Young, Partner, Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP

Take this course by clicking HERE

Some argue that corporate culture provides a more holistic and comprehensive view of the overall management philosophy and the control environment than many of the other widely-used industry metrics. The goal of this CPE course is to communicate the importance of corporate culture and how it impacts governance, risk, and compliance. Specifically, that corporate culture is the foundation on which the governance framework rests and if the culture is weak or if there is poor tone from the top the likelihood of financial reporting fraud increases. (December 2013)


Moderator:

  • Cindy Fornelli, Executive Director, Center for Audit Quality

Panelists:

  • Kathleen Edmond, Chief Ethics Officer, Best Buy
  • Suzanne M. Hopgood, President & CEO, The Hopgood Group, LLC
  • Michael R. Young, Willkie Farr & Gallagher, LLP

Take this course by clicking HERE.

All publicly traded companies are required to have a process that employees can use to report occupational misconduct—i.e., the whistleblower program.
In this CPE course, a panel of experts provides insights into how leading organizations have successfully integrated the whistleblower hotline into the corporate culture. They offer actionable recommendations that all companies can use to retool their existing programs. This course also addresses one of the major impediments to effective whistleblower programs: reluctance of employees to come forward because of the real or perceived fear of retaliation. Retaliation can take many forms—verbal abuse, physical threats, demotions—all of which can undermine an otherwise strong ethical culture. (July 2014)

Moderator:

  • Cindy Fornelli, Executive Director, Center for Audit Quality

Panelists:

  • Patricia Harned, Chief Executive Officer, The Ethics Resource Center
  • Janice Innis-Thompson, Senior Managing Director/Chief Compliance and Ethics Officer, TIAA-CREF
  • Kristin Rivera, Partner, Forensic Services, PwC

Take this course by clicking HERE.